Today’s topic is one many cruisers must experience to reach crucial locations: Crossings- Multi-night, non-stop sailing/motoring, many times without any sight of land the whole time.

Hello, Peeps! I once again reaching you from the muggy heat of the south (while trying to speed run this post at 6:00 AM Friday morning and listen to Giorno’s theme)! Today’s topic is one many cruisers must experience to reach crucial locations: Crossings- Multi-night, non-stop sailing/motoring, many times without any sight of land the whole time. This is what many cruisers face. Preparing for a crossing, while depending on how long it is, can take extensive provisioning, and sometimes weeks of waiting depending on weather windows. When said weather window appears, cruisers must be prepared to take them, leaving anchor or a marina slip, starting a multi-day passage. As a cruiser, it is recommended to have all items, large or small, tied down in some way (the seas can become rough easily), have pre-prepared or easily made foods in the galley for meals (depending on who’s cooking, they might not have lots of time to make huge extravagant meals), and have crossing kits at the ready in an easily accessible location. Crossing kits usually consist of packaged saltine crackers (in case of stomach ache), a small first-aid kit containing band-aids of all sizes and anti-biotic ointment (it’s easy to get small bumps and scrapes on rougher crossings, and even when not under heavy seas it’s always best to keep a band aid or two in an accessible location), and earplugs (in case of the engine/sails/weather being too loud and the people off watch who need sleep can’t). For crew on night watch, on the lookout for freighters, other boats, or any obstacles that might not be easily seen, it is useful to have M&Ms, chocolate covered coffee beans, or some other sugary food (and besides, who wouldn’t want that excuse?), coffee, tea, or energy drinks with caffeine or stimulants in them to stay awake, and podcasts or read-aloud books for entertainment. For those not expected to go on watch, it is best to find a good book or movie and get used to watching/reading that all day. Some crossings may not have the best sea-state, so sometimes it is simply best to find something to do and remain put. Leave it to the better weather to get up and roam the boat. Anyways, thanks for reading, and come back for next post! (also HAS ANYONE SEEN THE NEW LORD OF THE RINGS: RINGS OF POWER?!?!? IT’S SO COOL!!!)Kids


Our Friday posts are written by kids, for kids or those who are kids at heart.  Every post from LF2SF is written, photographed and edited onboard a cruising sailboat…actively cruising-  We live on our boat with two kids, a cat and a Great Dane.  This is actually a pretty right-on article, as our kids have done many overnight and multi-day passages with us, so read it carefully, the info is correct and good gauge.

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